Glaucoma and reading (screens and books) Help!!!
1
Entering edit mode
5 months ago
alenseas • 10
@alenseas

I am 38 years old and I was recently diagnosed with open angle Glaucoma (I already have some vision field lost on my left eye), we had some doubts if it may be normal tension glaucoma (the first 2 readings of my iop were 16 in both eyes and 12 in both eyes), but my last iop reading was 23 (left) and 26 (right). I started treatment with travorprost and my IOP will be check again in 2 months.

My question is: Could I save some vision (delay vision loss) if I stop using computers? Can screens raise my IOP? Is reading books better than reading from a screen?

I recently (2 years ago) changed my career path from teaching to IT, right now I work on a computer all day long and after that I study C.S for about 3-4 hours (previously I was also gaming but I stopped it). If saving some vision is the prize I wouldn't mind going back to my previous job.

I've spoken with 3 specialists so far, they are wonderful about explaining Glaucoma and IOP as well as treatments but no one will answer my doubts in regard to screens and book reading, they just talk about the 20/20/20 rule and about following the treatment (but they won't address my doubt about getting away from the screen could be beneficial delay some vision loss).

glaucoma • 203 views
ADD COMMENTlink
0
Entering edit mode
5 months ago
david 3.8k
@david_fe

Could I save some vision (delay vision loss) if I stop using computers?

I'll offer my opinion. I think the answer is a qualified "yes", but if you completely stop using computers, you may miss out on important health information related to glaucoma, so I'm not sure it would be a net win. I guess that depends on a lot of personal factors -- and from what you have said in your question, you use computers a lot more than most people, so you could potentially find a way to dramatically reduce their use, even if you don't stop completely.

For example, you say:

I started treatment with travorprost and my IOP will be check again in 2 months.

It is typical to see doctors use this pattern of "come back in a few months for an IOP check" -- but that protocol is far from optimal. As you proceed in your journey, the odds are that you will find out how inadequate that approach can be. There is a much better approach; self-tonometry. And the best way to learn about self-tonometry is to communicate with others who are doing it. You will only find communities of such people online. You will also gain an immense amount of other knowledge as well as support from an online community like FitEyes.

I founded FitEyes in 2006. I have often thought about stopping computer use, like you. I have thought about this many times. But in the end, what I gain from an online community like FitEyes more than offsets the potential disadvantages for me.

I was also gaming but I stopped it

That's probably a wise move. If you limit your screen time to those activities that in some way can be beneficial to your health and eyesight, such as research, education, participating in a community, etc., I think you will enjoy the best of all options.

Can screens raise my IOP?

Usually not directly. See this question with several good answers:

What causes eye pressure to increase during computer use? | Ask FitEyes

I have tested this myself many times and screens definitely do not raise my IOP. But see the question above for much more detailed answers. Here is another question on the topic:

Eye pressure spike in one eye during computer work | Ask FitEyes

As I said, the IOP problem is not usually directly from computer use, but is associated with the details of what we are doing. Many of those details apply equally, whether you are using a computer or not when they occur. But IOP is not the only (or even the main) health challenge that comes from looking at a computer screen for long hours.

Is reading books better than reading from a screen?

Yes, probably. However, as I said above, you will likely need some of both to optimize your results.

I work on a computer all day long and after that I study C.S for about 3-4 hours ... If saving some vision is the prize I wouldn't mind going back to my previous job.

If you have that option, it is worth considering because currently you are spending a lot of time looking at screens. Here's a recent article on the topic:

Too much screen time ages eyes | Ask FitEyes

For more, check the following tag on Ask FitEyes periodically.

Ask FitEyes - Tag: computer-use

ADD COMMENTlink

Login before adding your answer.

Traffic: 5 users visited in the last hour

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.