Insulin eye drops to lower IOP and regenerate retinal ganglion cells
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16 days ago
bcdefg1 • 120
@bcdefg1

Has anyone used insulin to lower their eye pressure and to reverse vision loss per these articles?

https://coolblindtech.com/breakthrough-study-shows-insulin-eye-drops-could-restore-sight-of-glaucoma-patients/

and

Insulin signalling promotes dendrite and synapse regeneration and restores circuit function after axonal injury | Brain | Oxford Academic (oup.com) If so, could you please let us know how you did it and the results you got?

This article explains how to dilute insulin for eye drops with just water:

[https://patents.justia.com/patent/20110294730\]

iop:intraocular-pressure slt:selective-laser-trabeculoplasty insulin • 253 views
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Hello. This is very interesting topic. I read the link you provided, however didn't understand how to prepare this drops. Could you please share you experience with that

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I contacted a compounding pharmacy about making insulin eyes drops. They make AST drops. They are researching it but Their response to me was that drops could not be frozen and mailed so they would have a 3 day expiration date.

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I saw the human trial in Canada suspended (Pending regulatory authority clearance) . I also heard that some people have been trying the insulin eye drop but don't know whether it is effective. Can anyone share the experience? Or any side effect?

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This topic sounds very promising and hope someone has access to whatever is needed to make it work ASAP. I just posted what I had found but have not tried it. Sorry.

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21 days ago
JJ • 50
@jj

I am not a doctor or an expert, so this is my personal opinion from what I found online.

You need to know some chemistry to do it yourself. It would be safer and probably more effective if you could get a compounding pharmacy prepare it for you. Any doctor can write you a prescription if he believes it might help you.

Apparently insulin eye drops can be prepared by diluting plain, fast insulin with water in a 1 to 10 proportion, plus standard buffer substances so that the drops have the same pH and tonicity as the eyes. Then, an absorption agent or penetration enhancer such as polyoxyethylene-20-oleyl ether (0.5%, Brij93, Sigma-Aldrich) is added. They say that the absorption agent drives the insulin to the back of the eye where it feeds the optic nerve and makes it grow back again. This is the formulation they used in the study that restored part of the vision to the lab animals. This is a patent application filed in 2010 by a doctor who apparently used insulin eye drops to treat his glaucoma patients

https://patents.justia.com/patent/20110294730

It is a very long reading but for what I understand he apparently just diluted plain insulin with water in the proportion of 1 to 10. He says it is well absorbed through the conjunctiva:

“Our preliminary studies have shown that the conjunctiva, unlike normal skin may not act as a barrier for entry of insulin due to the paucity of the presence of reduced glutathione. It is likely that the conjunctiva hardly contains any insulin blocking agent. The insulin deposited in the conjunctival sac is rapidly absorbed and reaches the trabecular meshwork and the ciliary body without being inactivated to exert its therapeutic effect.”

He says he added penetration enhancers to make them more effective and also to reach all the way into deeper eye tissues such as the retina so that the insulin can help restore retinal function:

“transconjunctival penetration of insulin and therapeutic, pharmaceutical, biochemical and biological agents or compounds can be facilitated by enhancers that can be used to further expedite the entry of these agents into the anterior chamber, trabecular meshwork, ciliary body, choroid and retina. With these enhancers, macromolecules up to 10 kDa are able to pass through the conjunctival sac layers of the eyes reaching the site of glaucoma where the blood vessels and retina are undergoing pathological changes.”

This, he adds “can increase the cell population; … and alleviate glaucoma related to this pathophysiology of trabecular meshwork cell loss and restores retinal function.” And “may prevent the progression of this disease by improving the retinal physiology to normalcy due to insulin trophic effects.”

He explains: “Preparation of Insulin Drops Take 100 units of rapid or intermediate acting insulin (or IGF-1) and dilute in 10 ml of sterile saline or distilled water or other carriers and facilitators as described above. The pH can be adjusted to prevent the sting when dropped to the conjunctival sac. Nanograms or micrograms of local anesthetics may be added to prevent stinging. In this preparation each ml contains 10 units of insulin…each drop contains 0.5 units of insulin.

The concentration of the insulin content can be increased to 0.75, 1.00, 1.5, or 2.00 units of insulin per drop by increasing the insulin content in the dilutant preparation. It can be also decreased by reducing the insulin units used for the preparation of the ophthalmic drops. The eye drop preparation should be isotonic with blood. As will be the ophthalmic compositions intended for direct application to the eye will be formulated so as to have a pH and tonicity which are compatible with the eye. This will normally require a buffer to maintain the pH of the composition at or near physiologic pH (i.e., 7.4) and may require a tonicity agent to bring the osmolality of the composition to a level at or near 210-320 millimoles per kilogram (mOsm/kg).”

He says that insulin eye drops can be used along with any other glaucoma eye drops and that doing it allows to reduce their dosage. The treatment seems to be very safe and to produce no side effects in the animals. I understand that it can be legally prescribed by any doctor and prepared by any compounding pharmacy that prepares custom-made eye drops because the only ingredient that needs government approval is the insulin, which has been approved by the FDA many years ago. Let us know if you try and what results you see.

Best luck!

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Hello JJ ! Thank you for detailed reply. I personally digging this topic for the last few month and find it very promising. Did you tried insulin drops? If yes, what's your result?

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