Eye pressure spike in one eye during computer work
1
Entering edit mode
6 months ago
@member

My iCare Home almost always shows my eye pressure spikes on my left eye up to a range of high 20's to low 30's about half an hour after I start working on the computer. I'm a software developer and I have to work. When I get up, walk around, up and down the stairs, my pressure in that eye goes back down to 18 or 16. I wear blue light glasses and everything and the "seeing" is done by my right eye mostly, my left eye can barely see the letters on the screen.

Is there anyone that has noticed this? Any tips on what to do?

computer-use intraocular-pressure glaucoma eye-strain • 194 views
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3
Entering edit mode
6 months ago
Wren 320
@wren

Check whether the muscles in your face, particularly those around your eye area, are becoming tense while doing computer work (or anything else). Consciously relax them. Make a point of doing this check-relax every few minutes. Soon it will become second nature to have a relaxed face while doing computer work. This might help prevent your IOP rise. It would be interesting to know if it does. Try also to do the same with your mind. Be busy with the work but not too emotionally invested in it – aim for a relaxed, accepting emotional state.

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Entering edit mode
6 months ago
david 2.9k
@david_fe

From this part of your question I get a clue:

the "seeing" is done by my right eye mostly, my left eye can barely see the letters on the screen.

I believe your left eye is experiencing strain.

To resolve that you could try a few experiments such as:

  1. Bates Method techniques for relaxing. For example, acquire the habit of softly blinking automatically and frequently. There are other Bates Method techniques that might help. The best option is to find a good local Bates teacher.

  2. Use EMG biofeedback to determine if there is muscle tightness around that eye. If so, learn to relax the muscles in your face.

  3. Cover your left eye so it doesn't do any work and doesn't experience any strain. (I'm not sure if this is a good long term solution; these are just idea to experiment with)

  4. Find a Behavior Optometrist to work with.

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2
Entering edit mode
6 months ago
@member

Try the 20/20/20 rule - every 20 mins look 20 ft. away for 20 seconds.

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